Trope Collaborative
Starting Point
How many people are in your family? That was the question my daughter asked. I could not answer. While genealogy is a general interest of most families, the established metaphors of trees, and organizational diagrams is an expected approach for documentation. Was there a more engaging and informative way to communicate family relationships?

Exploration
We began to explore different ways to express people and generations as well as show why there are 1st, 2nd and 3rd cousins and that these terms are relative to which generation one belongs. Moving away from top-down hierarchy towards concentric circles became a stronger way to show focus and growth.

Solution
A series of concentric circles and use of two colors to denote the use of the family name, vs. other married family names was used to create a series of generational concentric pieces representing parents and children. The result is a more engaging, interesting and more intuitive way to understand the generational relationships between family members.
Family Tree blank thumbnail first generation thumbnail second generation thumbnail third generation thumbnail Fifth thumbnail
click to enlarge image
Empty Kallish Family Tree Diagram
1 | Generational Rings
In order to create both focus and growth, rings were created. These rings also provided visual structure to the asymmetric growth in a family tree.
Kallish Family Tree with First Generation
2 | Original and First Generation
The core are the two grandparents and the six children. The gray color is to symbolize the passing away of a member. The green is a living member that has changed her last name due to marriage.
Kallish Family Tree with Second Generation added
3 | Second Generation
The second generation grew at a large pace and reflects the post-war prosperity of having larger families.
Kallish Family Tree with third generation added
4 | Third Generation
The third generation also grew, but at different rates. Due to age differences, second generation children were not old enough to have children yet.
Fifth Generation added to Kallish Family Tree
5 | Fourth Generation
This is an emerging generation that is still very young. Overall, the current state demonstrates the different growth patterns within a certain family line.
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1/5

Charlie Trotter Book Covers, second and fifth.

Information Design
Family Tree
In order to create both focus and growth, rings were created. These rings also provided visual structure to the asymmetric growth in a family tree.
2/5

Charlie Trotter Book Covers, second and fifth.

Information Design
Family Tree
The core are the two grandparents and the six children. The gray color is to symbolize the passing away of a member. The green is a living member that has changed her last name due to marriage.
3/5

Charlie Trotter Book Covers, second and fifth.

Information Design
Family Tree
The second generation grew at a large pace and reflects the post-war prosperity of having larger families.
4/5

Charlie Trotter Book Covers, second and fifth.

Information Design
Family Tree
The third generation also grew, but at different rates. Due to age differences, second generation children were not old enough to have children yet.
5/5

Charlie Trotter Book Covers, second and fifth.

Information Design
Family Tree
This is an emerging generation that is still very young. Overall, the current state demonstrates the different growth patterns within a certain family line.